Seizure rescue medication


Oral Rescue Medicines 101 Epilepsy Foundation

10.20.2018 writer Jack Hoggarth
Seizure rescue medication

Talk to your health care provider about the best way to use rescue seizure medicine. Make sure you have a specific plan on when to use it and when not to.

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Some people don’t like the idea of using a medicine rectally, or their doctor may feel that an oral medicine is better for them. You may be asked to take or give a medicine in one of three ways.

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In these situations, talk to your doctor about rectal forms of the medicine such as Diastat. However, it may be hard to give medicines this way to an infant or young child, a person who is too sleepy or not able to cooperate, a person who can not keep the medicine in their mouth (for example someone who drools or has vomited), or a person who is having too many seizures. Taking the pills orally is usually easier for most people.

People who are prescribed these medicines or who are asked to give them to someone else (such as their child) should receive one on one teaching from a doctor or nurse. Some forms of injections and nasal sprays are being developed and tested. The following information will help people understand important facts about giving and using rescue medicines that are meant to be taken orally or sublingually (which means under the tongue). When used outside of a hospital setting, they are usually given by mouth. Some fast-acting medicines, such as diazepam or lorazepam, can be used 'as needed' to stop seizures.

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Effect of rescue medication on seizure duration in non

9.19.2018 writer Emma Adderiy
Seizure rescue medication
Effect of rescue medication on seizure duration in non

Eur J Paediatr Neurol. 2018 Jan;22(1):56-63. doi: 10.1016/j.ejpn.2017.07.017. Epub 2017 Aug 2. Effect of rescue medication on seizure duration in.

Characterize the real-world management of and outcomes for children with epilepsy receiving rescue medication for prolonged acute convulsive seizures (PACS) in the community.

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Investigators provided clinical assessments and parents/guardians completed questionnaires. Statistical tests were post hoc; p values are descriptive.

Effect of rescue medication on seizure duration in non

8.18.2018 writer Emma Adderiy
Seizure rescue medication
Effect of rescue medication on seizure duration in non

Characterize the real-world management of and outcomes for children with epilepsy receiving rescue medication for prolonged acute convulsive seizures.

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Rescue medication use was significantly associated with average seizures lasting <5 min (χ2 = 58.8; p < 0.0001). Most patients experienced PACS despite regular anti-epilepsy medication. According to parents, the average duration of their child's seizures without rescue medication was <5 min in 35.7% of patients, 5–<20 min in 42.6%, and ≥20 min in 21.7% ( n = 258); with rescue medication seizure duration was <5 min in 69.4% of patients, 5–<20 min in 25.6%, and ≥20 min in 5.0%.

The community use of rescue medication for prolonged epileptic

7.17.2018 writer Jack Hoggarth
Seizure rescue medication
The community use of rescue medication for prolonged epileptic

For all children in the EPIC area who had been prescribed epilepsy rescue medication for use in the community a questionnaire was completed by the clinician.

A questionnaire was also completed by the carers about their experience of the use of rescue medication in their child. For all children in the EPIC area who had been prescribed epilepsy rescue medication for use in the community a questionnaire was completed by the clinician for each child relating to rescue medication prescribed, the epilepsy syndrome and seizure type.

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It was felt by families to be the safest (least side effects reported) and the most effective (most likely to terminate seizures) of the rescue medications.

Is intranasal midazolam an effective rescue medication in

5.15.2018 writer Jack Hoggarth
Seizure rescue medication
Is intranasal midazolam an effective rescue medication in

Midazolam was prescribed buccally if excessive head movement accompanied seizures. The protocol reverted to the usual rescue medication if there was no.

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This field trial was designed to test the feasibility of the use of intranasal midazolam as an alternative to rectal diazepam in a cohort of patients with severe epilepsy who require rescue medication as part of their treatment.